Thread: Argentine Economy

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  1. #1925
    Quote Originally Posted by MataHari  [View Original Post]
    Can you guys confirm that price listing?

    https://www.expatistan.com/cost-of-living/buenos-aires
    Good reference. Thanks for posting.

  2. #1924

    Confirmation

    Can you guys confirm that price listing?

    https://www.expatistan.com/cost-of-living/buenos-aires

  3. #1923
    Winner 2017 Noob of the year


    Posts: 82
    The price of pussy is not directly attached to the exchange rate, as the pussy is not used up like for example gasoline you can keep selling the same pussy over and over so the cost of pussy is imaginary and based entirely on the woman's immediate perceived needs for money or luxury items. The locals also have some limits of what they can pay for pussy, so it is not surprising that the cost pf pussy remains at a certain peso rate despite decrease in the value of the peso. Of course high end girls charging USD prices are just pulling a number out of a hat also. Just counter a USD price with a peso price reflecting an exchange rate of a year ago these chicas are often not math wizards they may go with a much lower peso price. Of course some will pull out their phone and do a calculation. But ultimately the price of pussy is largely imaginary so it won't always tack real prices.

    Quote Originally Posted by Slipknot  [View Original Post]
    FYI -.

    Of the three Independent girls I have seen recently, two have kept their price the same as 8 months ago and one increased her rates by about 15%, three months ago (she is high end). I did not question it, but would suspect it is due to the peso drop. And this was before the additional drop last week. I have also seen a few changes in restaurant prices, but to be honest, I don't pay that much attention to what each item costs.

    Not sure if that helps you or not. Cheers!
    .

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  5. #1922
    Quote Originally Posted by Gandolf50  [View Original Post]
    Large normal coffee 70$.

    Yuppie coffees as high a 335$.

    Regular coffee with a ham and cheese on toast 145$.

    Prices as of today, hope this helps.
    Thanks, that does help.

    Bs As prices converted to USD:

    Coffee: $1.82.

    Yuppie coffee: $8.71 (yikes! Glad I am not a yuppie).

    Reg coffee with ham/cheese/toast: $3.51.

    For comparison, down the road, in the US (at Dunkin Donuts (their coffee sucks)):

    Coffee: $1.89.

    Yuppie coffee: $4.19.

    Reg coffee with ham/cheese/toast: $5.89.

    1 hour with a 6/7: $250.

    I am guessing that Starbucks is only popular with foreigners and the wealthy.

    The Argie Peso is starting to remind me of the Italian Lira, circa early 1980s. The key tipping point is when things get really cheap.

  6. #1921
    Winner 2017 Noob of the year


    Posts: 82
    I had a café con leche with two medialunas for $40 pesos yesterday at Once Station, the exchange rate was 37 pesos to the dollar or something like that so I guess that equates to $0.50 for a cup of coffee if you attribute half the cost to the medialunas. I see similar deals for two medialunas and a café con leche $70 everywhere which I guess equates to $1 for a cup of coffee. I did not check at Starbucks, Starbucks is selling a brand not just a coffee, probably prices will be much higher at tourist spots.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gandolf50  [View Original Post]
    Large normal coffee 70$.

    Yuppie coffees as high a 335$.

    Regular coffee with a ham and cheese on toast 145$.

    Prices as of today, hope this helps.

  7. #1920

    Prices at Bonifides

    Large normal coffee 70$.

    Yuppie coffees as high a 335$.

    Regular coffee with a ham and cheese on toast 145$.

    Prices as of today, hope this helps.

  8. #1919
    Quote Originally Posted by WildWalleye  [View Original Post]
    Thanks. Yes, I am trying to get a grip on real prices. So, if I go to La Biela and am having my doble cortado and demi lunas, whilst contemplating getting some honey on my stinger, what are the prices? I have plenty of references from past time in Bs As. I am more curious to know if a cup of coffee is $0.50 or $2.00. How much is a pack of smokes? What is 30 mins at a privado?

    Cheers.
    FYI -.

    Of the three Independent girls I have seen recently, two have kept their price the same as 8 months ago and one increased her rates by about 15%, three months ago (she is high end). I did not question it, but would suspect it is due to the peso drop. And this was before the additional drop last week. I have also seen a few changes in restaurant prices, but to be honest, I don't pay that much attention to what each item costs.

    Not sure if that helps you or not. Cheers!

  9. #1918
    Quote Originally Posted by Macgoo  [View Original Post]
    Hey, W Squared .

    I see that youre trying to get a handle on BsAs real-world inflation too.

    What I do is get on the Coto Grocers website and look at the price of food staples (frequently updated). I then compare those prices to what I was paying during Dec of 17 (peso/us$ @ 19). For me, the price of domestic cheese, orange juice, milk, Coke/Pepsi is a good indication. I buy a lot of this during extended stays. Notwithstanding sales prices, I find that these items are pretty much the same as they were in Dec.

    If you dont already have a price reference point, you can always start one. E.g. On day one note the Coto grocery item price, and compare it that price on, say, day 45.

    Hope it helps!
    Thanks. Yes, I am trying to get a grip on real prices. So, if I go to La Biela and am having my doble cortado and demi lunas, whilst contemplating getting some honey on my stinger, what are the prices? I have plenty of references from past time in Bs As. I am more curious to know if a cup of coffee is $0.50 or $2.00. How much is a pack of smokes? What is 30 mins at a privado?

    Cheers.

  10. #1917

    Food prices, poontang not included

    Hey, W Squared .

    I see that youre trying to get a handle on BsAs real-world inflation too.

    What I do is get on the Coto Grocers website and look at the price of food staples (frequently updated). I then compare those prices to what I was paying during Dec of 17 (peso/us$ @ 19). For me, the price of domestic cheese, orange juice, milk, Coke/Pepsi is a good indication. I buy a lot of this during extended stays. Notwithstanding sales prices, I find that these items are pretty much the same as they were in Dec.

    If you dont already have a price reference point, you can always start one. E.g. On day one note the Coto grocery item price, and compare it that price on, say, day 45.

    Hope it helps!

    Quote Originally Posted by WildWalleye  [View Original Post]
    I believe that we are starting to see this take place. The currency has been crushed, recently.

    What is happening to prices? What are you guys paying for a cup of coffee, empenadsas and poontang?

  11. #1916
    Quote Originally Posted by WildWalleye  [View Original Post]
    ...and in order for things to "normalize" the devaluation of the peso needs to exceed inflation...
    I believe that we are starting to see this take place. The currency has been crushed, recently.

    What is happening to prices? What are you guys paying for a cup of coffee, empenadsas and poontang?

  12. #1915
    Quote Originally Posted by Jhskiier  [View Original Post]
    Plus bureaucratic and legal issues. I looked at taking a stake in a business down there about a year after Macri came in. Small deal, nothing like a forex play, but oh boy the fuckery. Lets just say the accounting was ... Artistic, and not because they were bad guys, but hiding money and greasing skids are accepted parts of competition.

    I still dig around while I'm there, if only to make the trip a write off and get plugged into the city. But anything that matters involves significant inside baseball and most official interactions are an adaptation of "Esprando a Godot." Sorry Argentina, I'm not sophisticated enough to price that sort of risk.

    That said, there are still strong underlying strengths, and by underlying, I mean deep in the bucket. Highest regional broadband penetration, a relatively educated population, a ton of unexploited minerals, oil, and gas. 50% of the country doesn't have a bank account, Still the most culturally significant country in South America. How they unlock all that I have no idea.
    Broadband is nice, but not the great equalizer it was promised to be.

    As for natural resources, Brazil owns most of Argentina's.

  13. #1914
    Senior Member


    Posts: 1042
    Quote Originally Posted by Jhskiier  [View Original Post]
    That said, there are still strong underlying strengths, and by underlying, I mean deep in the bucket. Highest regional broadband penetration, a relatively educated population, a ton of unexploited minerals, oil, and gas. 50% of the country doesn't have a bank account, Still the most culturally significant country in South America. How they unlock all that I have no idea.
    Except broadband, I think that’s been the issue with Argentina for the last 100 years.

  14. #1913
    Quote Originally Posted by Jhskiier  [View Original Post]
    Plus bureaucratic and legal issues. I looked at taking a stake in a business down there about a year after Macri came in. Small deal, nothing like a forex play, but oh boy the fuckery. Lets just say the accounting was ... Artistic, and not because they were bad guys, but hiding money and greasing skids are accepted parts of competition.

    I still dig around while I'm there, if only to make the trip a write off and get plugged into the city. But anything that matters involves significant inside baseball and most official interactions are an adaptation of "Esprando a Godot." Sorry Argentina, I'm not sophisticated enough to price that sort of risk.

    That said, there are still strong underlying strengths, and by underlying, I mean deep in the bucket. Highest regional broadband penetration, a relatively educated population, a ton of unexploited minerals, oil, and gas. 50% of the country doesn't have a bank account, Still the most culturally significant country in South America. How they unlock all that I have no idea.
    Let me know when you are going back to Bs As. Maybe we should meet up.

    I bought and sold a company in Argentina in the late '00s. My local lawyers and accountants were excellent. We made a ton of money. I have looked at acquiring several businesses in Argentina, since Macri was elected, but I have a very strict discipline when evaluating ops. I think that this currency blow up is part of what I have been waiting for.

  15. #1912
    Quote Originally Posted by WildWalleye  [View Original Post]
    ...and in order for things to "normalize" the devaluation of the peso needs to exceed inflation...
    Quote Originally Posted by WildWalleye  [View Original Post]
    Personally, I prefer Argentinian women to Brazilian women. I really like the old world feel of Bs As, the wine, the food and the culture. I'd be willing to pay a premium for those things.

    Despite the IMF life-line, things (from a currency perspective) are going to get worse in Argentina, before they get better. Additionally, as previously discussed, despite currency devaluation, the inflation of prices has offset much of the devaluations, therefore, things haven't actually become much cheaper. That means that the scales haven't been tipped in favor of the foreign investor (something that needs to happen in order to entice foreign investment).
    Plus bureaucratic and legal issues. I looked at taking a stake in a business down there about a year after Macri came in. Small deal, nothing like a forex play, but oh boy the fuckery. Lets just say the accounting was ... Artistic, and not because they were bad guys, but hiding money and greasing skids are accepted parts of competition.

    I still dig around while I'm there, if only to make the trip a write off and get plugged into the city. But anything that matters involves significant inside baseball and most official interactions are an adaptation of "Esprando a Godot." Sorry Argentina, I'm not sophisticated enough to price that sort of risk.

    That said, there are still strong underlying strengths, and by underlying, I mean deep in the bucket. Highest regional broadband penetration, a relatively educated population, a ton of unexploited minerals, oil, and gas. 50% of the country doesn't have a bank account, Still the most culturally significant country in South America. How they unlock all that I have no idea.

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  17. #1911
    Quote Originally Posted by PirateMorgan  [View Original Post]
    If inflation is outpacing the peso...that is one xxxxload of inflation. Ouch.
    ...and in order for things to "normalize" the devaluation of the peso needs to exceed inflation...

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